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Blog Archive: archaeology

[image] My Introduction to Range Creek: A Greater Appreciation for Archaeology

My Introduction to Range Creek: A Greater Appreciation for Archaeology

Our executive director describes his first visit to the amazing field station in Range Creek Canyon.
[image] The Ecological Legacy of Bears Ears

The Ecological Legacy of Bears Ears

Indigenous subsistence of the Bears Ears region modified the landscape, leaving ecological legacies that persist today.

[image] Plants Reveal How People Lived in Bears Ears

Plants Reveal How People Lived in Bears Ears

A collaborative effort is revealing which plants were important to people who have lived in Bears Ears over millennia.
[image] New Archaeology Guidelines Set to Save Old Collections

New Archaeology Guidelines Set to Save Old Collections

A handy new guide will help expert archaeologists better preserve collections that have gone neglected until now.
[image] New Study Explores How Utah's Fremont Farmers Watered Their Crops

New Study Explores How Utah's Fremont Farmers Watered Their Crops

Research by NHMU archaeologists considers how Fremont people balanced the costs and benefits of watering crops.
[image] Objects Tell Stories of the Fremont People

Objects Tell Stories of the Fremont People

Objects found at Baker Village give insight into Fremont ways of life.
[image] The Birth of the Antiquities Act

The Birth of the Antiquities Act

Read about the early days of the Antiquities Act.
[image] NHMU's Barrier Canyon Mural

NHMU's Barrier Canyon Mural

No one knows for sure when Utah’s most famous rock art – the Great Gallery found in Horseshoe Canyon – was created, but we pay homage to it and to the WPA-commissioned art piece hanging in our 1st floor, behind the Admissions desk.
[image] Bold Figures, Blurred History: The Great Gallery in Horseshoe Canyon

Bold Figures, Blurred History: The Great Gallery in Horseshoe Canyon

The Great Gallery is one of the most significant pictograph panels in the American Southwest, yet archaeologists have struggled over when it was created and what it could mean.
[image] In the Tiny World of Starch Grains, Bigger is Better

In the Tiny World of Starch Grains, Bigger is Better

It takes a thorough understanding of the biology of starch to determine which starch grains are being recovered from archaeological sites. Lisbeth Louderback, our Curator of Archaeology, has discovered that bigger grains yield the best information for identification purposes.